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20121108
20121116
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KQED (PBS) 18
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >>
. the architect of the law that says if you are white, you are all right. if you are brown, show me your papers. that resonated throughout the country. back in february, with that endorsement. it was great for the republican primary. for the general election -- there was a reaction from hispanics. and even marco rubio cannot correct the problem. they have a deeper problem. they have to deal with the george wallaces of the republican party. >> charles? >> and the demographics, the idea of republicans being white, i think, is wrong. it is true they have problems with african-americans, single women, and young people. those tend to be liberal. with hispanics that are naturally more conservative, religious, a catholic, it requires a change in policy on immigration. it can be done in one stroke. once it is done, we will not be speaking about the demographic issue. we will be talking about ideological issues. >> all right. let's talk about the new congress. >> i would not have been able to do this without your unbelievable support. you, my friends, stood with me when others tried to buy this election
electorate. here in california, big win for governor jerry brown and his proposition 30, brings relief to scho schools. >> californians made the courageous decision to protect our schools and colleges and strengthen the california dream. bl >> belva: and a win-win for california democrats with an apparent two-thirds super majority in the legislature and the ability to raise taxes without votes from republicans. >> i promise that we will exercise this new power with strength but also with humility and with reason. >> belva: also, author maya angelou shares her story and warm words of wisdom about the meaning of friendship. >> it keeps you alive. it keeps you awake. it keeps you trying to be the best. >> belva: coming up next. . >>> hello, i'm belva davis, and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on this special night, my last, as host here are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle". lisa vor der brugen, "bay area news group." paul rogers, environment writer for "san jose mercury news." and carla marinucci, "san francisco chronicle," senior political reporter. carla,
, many want to be just like her. dr. gordon brown is hearing about the ambitions people have, many girls never see the inside of the classroom. she risked her life to campaign for girls' education and the united nations is going to carry on that fight. she pledged to campaign for them just before she was shot. >> simply for going to school, wanting to go to school, it is so unspeakable. >> they raise their voices in her honor, a nobel peace prize. the courageous teenager would be a worthy recipient. for more of the global attention her case has drawn, i spoke to the founder of women for women international that joined us from new york. the effect taking place in pakistan, is it possible something positive could come out of her plight? >> i would hope so. she is a representation of the plight of many girls. not only pakistan, but all over the world. a girl is very articulate, clear about what she wants, and within the frame of her culture and religion, is still targeted for assassination for speaking up and wanting to go to school. it triggered something that the terrorists pushed their l
are black, brown, asian, hispanic, middle eastern, they voted between 70 and 90% democratic and the white vote only went by 18 points to mitt romney. john of the seven largest states in the country, illinois, new york, pennsylvania, california have gone democratic in six straight elections. the other two, ohio and florida have swung democratic in two elections. and in texas, the white folks in chief connection texas -- texas are now a minority. >>> do you think this was a split verdict? >> not at all. the president won 51.4% of the popular vote which he becomes the sixth president in history to win two terms with over 50% of the dwight eisenhower, i might add. he won an electoral college landslide. george w. bush with a much smaller electoral win pronounced he had a mandate. this president is not going to use that language, it is oh, so 20th century, not how he intends to govern. but beneath the numbers of a reelected president, a senate that is divided, there was an earthquake. it was an election that, republicans should have won in a bad economy, with all that money, and they lost virtu
they can to get out. roads and recreation grounds are submerged in brown, soupy water. and in some warts of this region the only way to get around is by boat. elsewhere, it is just not safe at all. the area affected is just north of rome. here it has been raining for days. the bad weather has swept across italy. in venice, seasonal flooding was higher and more widespread than normal. and unless you were in a gondola, there was little way to stay dry. there the floods are receding. but it is now the waterlogged regions of tuscana and brea that are baring the brunt. "bbc news." >> right now china's ruling communicatist party is meeting in beijing to anoint its new leaders. among the most pressing issues they will face, a territorial dispute with japan that has erupted into the worst crisis interest the two nations in decades. at issue is a group of islands. our correspondent has gone to take a closer look and to see what is fueling all this controversy. >> just after dawn we get our first view of the islands. a jagged huddle of rocks sticking up from the deep blue waters of the east china
neil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today
brown: new details emerge about the affair that led to the resignation of c.i.a. director david petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agency. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of >> this is n.b.r.
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama was back at the white house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they--
that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers eat twice as much meat on average as those in the countryside. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
a deal unless it includes higher taxes on the wealthy. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the president's remarks, and our own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, an
'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the war which has claimed civilian deaths on both sides. >> brown: then, b.p. admits to felony charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under contro
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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